Mount Snowdon via Llanberis Path

Hiking up Mount Snowdon

As a family we have hiked up Mount Snowdon a handful of times. The first time we did it was about 9 years ago with our two children. We took the Miners Track back then and have since done the Pyg Track and Llanberis Path.

Hiking up the mountain with three young children, I would definitely recommend doing the Llanberis path.

Llanberis Path

Llanberis path is the longest route to take up to Snowdon’s summit. The distance is 9 miles there and back, with an ascent of 975 mtrs and offers some amazing views of the surrounding mountains. As it is thought to be the easiest path to take it can be popular with families and leisure walkers and can get quite busy at times.

The route

The path climbs along the Llanberis – Snowdon railtrack and is simple to navigate. It starts just behind the Snowdon Mountain railway station, at the end of a road you reach a cattle grid and the information boards.

Llanberis path map/route up Mount Snowdon

As you head along a steep road you reach a cafe and just beyond that you will take a left through a gate, this is where the terrain begins to change and you clearly note that you are at the foot of the mountain.

The track becomes a little more rocky and can be unstable under the foot causing you to trip. It can be quite slippy when wet too.

On route up Llanberis Path

The hike up can be very tiring and you will work up a sweat so I would advise you to carry extra clothing so you can layer up later on when you are closer to the summit.

It was quite a cloudy day, not so cold and the rain stayed away for us. It was ideal hiking conditions but not so great for the camera. We managed to get some clear photos on the ascend to the mountain, but it was too misty up at the summit to see anything clearly.

The Llanberis path leads along the railway and it’s a beautiful sight to see the steam train run along side you

The boys were particularly happy to see that the sheep were all around, not just on the low level ground but also over half way up the mountain you will spot sheep grazing behind the rocks

Sheep on Mount Snowdon

Just before half way the train line runs along to the right of the pathway but you will need to walk under the track. It’s not long after that you see a building far in the distance. This is the halfway house, where you can buy some refreshments. On previous visits, there has always been a toilet here to use but it seems that they may have closed it as it is no longer available for customers to use.

Mount Snowdon Steam train on way descending down the mountain

The path steepens

Once you have had a well earned break at the cafe, the ascend becomes a little more trickier and the path steepens. Is it as this point where you begin to feel the legs become a little tighter and start to ache. It was here when the visibility began to get pretty poor and we just knew it was going to get worse.

Holding hands
Giving me a helping hand up the steep path

The pathway runs under the Snowdon railtrack again and as you come out from under the bridge on the other side, you may well notice a few hikers coming along from the left hand side. These are the braver few that have just walked along the Crib Goch ( I did wonder why someone was asking the way to the summit, i thought that maybe they had gone to find a toilet somewhere but my son corrected me)

The Summit is nigh

You know you are near when you notice a huge rock in the middle of the path. This is where five pathways meet – Pyg Track, Llanberis, Miners Track, Snowdon ranger and Crib Goch.

We didn’t get much of a view at the top as it was so cloudy. I believe we were within a cloud as the air was very wet.

Visibility was poor and it was much colder at the top.

It was also very busy. We decided against battling with the other hikers to the Summit, as you can see from the photos it was too busy to take the children to.

  • Within a cloud on Mount Snowdon
  • Just below the summit of Mount Snowdon
  • A quick pose at the top of the mountain
  • The train on it's way to the Summit of Snowdon

Once we had visited the toilet in the cafe at the top, it was time to get our legs working again and take the path back down.

The Descent

Obviously the descent is much easier than the ascent but you still have to be careful especially when the visibility is poor. The stones under the foot are wet making them slippery. We did notice someone had a fall and was nursing a bloody face and a sore foot.

It took us a total of 5 and a quarter hours from top to bottom, including a few little breaks. Not bad going! That was 3 and a quarter hours up and 2 down.

Before venturing on the Mountain You will need

  • Strong ankle supporting shoes/boots
  • Waterproof clothes
  • Gloves and hat ( sunglasses- the snow can be blinding with the sun)
  • Extra layers of clothing in a rucksack
  • Mobile charger
  • Food and drink
  • Check the weather conditions
  • Maps are available

The more active side of the family

Before we set of the two oldest and Dad had decided that they were going to run up the mountain. We had agreed that they would go ahead and the youngest and I would meet them on our way up. We saw them coming from behind the fog just over half way up, just as the path was steepening.

Dad and the middle boy decided to carry on running down and would wait for as the bottom, the eldest stopped his run and wanted to go to the top again with his brother and me.

I think they suffered a little as they couldn’t wait to get into a hot bath with some salts to soothe their aching legs. In fact, I think we all needed it!

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Encouraging my Children to be Adventurous

‘Fill your life with adventures and with stories to tell’

Children need adventure, they need to experience risk in order to develop their ability to deal with situations and to build up their self confidence. It encourages them to be more resilient and to think for themselves. Whether the adventure be small or big, indoors or out children should be experiencing adventure to build up their skills and to able to assess the danger around them. Not only do children develop trust, empathy and compassion but they  learn to master their own fears and are able to help others get through them.

As parents we should be teaching our children to assess the danger and how to deal with the risk of being adventurous. As much as I want to wrap my boys up in cotton wool and lock them away from any danger I know that I must allow them to experience adventure to gain knowledge and new skills.

I want my boys to have memories of us being adventurous together and hopefully they will last a lifetime and something that they will then take on with their own families.

I want us to visit new places together.

I want us to try new challenges, like rock climbing and diving.

A couple of years ago I took my boys camping in Lee Valley, we travelled around on our bikes and spent the summer nights out walking along the River Lee. It’s a holiday that they still talk about and are constantly requesting to go back. It didn’t cost much and wasn’t a glamorous holiday but it was something we did together as a unit. We cycled along the river bank with an unknown destination, stopping where it took our fancy. We cycled for miles using only our sense of direction to get back. Searched for geocaches. Played hide and seek in the forests. Climbed trees. And picniced in fields.

Enjoying the scenery

It was the first time I had ever gone out cycling alone so far with the boys, but I am so glad that I did it. As we don’t live too far from there, we travelled there and back on our bikes with just clothes in our rucksacks. We had to deal with getting lost, bee stings and how to deal with punctures. It was amazing, in fact I am too scared to go back as I don’t think we could experience another holiday like it.

Now, we’re not the most adventurous family but we still try new things, even if we are scared.

We have hiked up Mount Snowdon as a family  ,entered Mud races, jumped from a crane, been canoeing, open water swimming; not all that adventurous compared to some but it’s a start 🙂

We spent this summer in Malta. The boys went swimming in the sea everyday. They taught themselves to dive, to snorkel and faced their fears by jumping off of cliffs into the crystal clear water below.

I, myself, am not that confident and would call myself a scaredy cat. As I watched my boys jump in but couldn’t face doing it myself. It took me at least a week to pluck up the courage to jump in from about 2 metres high. I was so glad that I did it, my boys just kept hugging me. I felt that I had achieved something, although it was little in comparison to what my boys had been doing. I felt a sense of adrenaline rush through me.

Here are a few things the boys got up to in the summer

Exploring caves

Exploring under the water

Jumping from cliffs into the sea. They were taught to assess the danger first. To swim around first and to see how deep it was. And to also look out for any jellyfish.

Having a mud wash

In this day and age where children would rather communicate via social media and spend most of their spare time with their face in front of a screen I think that it’s important to encourage our children to venture outside and explore, to learn for themselves and to achieve that sense of adrenaline from adventure. I want my boys to be challenged and to be comfortable in their surroundings.

I want to spend time with my boys outside, it’s something we can do together without the distractions of modern technology. It’s about making memories, enjoying each others company and creating stories to tell for when they grow up.

 

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Indoor Skydive: A Family Adventure

Ever wondered what it was like to fly?

Flying is a sensation that very few people, especially young children, get to experience. Indoor skydiving gives you a unique feeling of flying. With the use of a vertical wind tunnel you get to make your dream of flying become a reality. It is a safe and fun experience with a highly qualified instructor that teaches you to fly,step by step.

We was very lucky to have been given Family tickets for a flight experience with iFly, which has a centre at Milton Keynes.

Our flight was booked at 12pm but they require you to check in an hour before. We filled out the necessary forms in preparation for the flights, but you if you get to iFly in plenty of time you can fill them out before you fly at the centre.

Everyone in the group was introduced to the flight instructor who gives you 1-1 help in the tunnel. Our instructor was very informative and friendly. We was all briefed about what to expect inside the tunnel, watched an instructional video and then shown the hand signals that would be used for communication inside. We was all then issued our flight jumpsuits, goggles and helmet.

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The younger boys got to choose a helmet that had little teddy bears sticking out of the top. They looked so cute when they were in the tunnel and the little teddy was bobbing about in the wind.

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Once all suited up they were ready to fly

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We made our way to the flight tunnel, which had viewing all around. The vertical wind tunnel can produce 165mph wind speeds. All of the flyers lined up one by one to wait their turn to go into the tunnel and take flight with the instructor.

Before you enter the tunnel, you have to stand at the entrance with your arms stretched above your head and when the instructor gives you a thumbs up you have to lean forward towards him. The instructor then grabs your arms and leads you into the air tunnel safely so that your legs don’t catch on the entrance. Once in the middle, the instructor holds onto you until you get your balance and then he let’s go of you so that you can drift off. Once you have mastered the key flying skills you are able to try more advanced manoeuvres (but this comes with more lessons) You get to experience freefall as you float on a smooth cushion of air.

The aim is to relax and have fun. Stretch out your arms and legs and in Superman Style…Fly!

The whole experience lasts for an hour, with about 5 minutes flying in the tunnel.

We chose to have a High Flight, which was the best part of the experience. With the instructor guidance and support, they boys were flown 3-6 feet up the tunnel. They flew in a rise and fall pattern whilst turning. The High Flight happened for the last 15-20 seconds of their second flight

With no parachute, no jumping and nothing attached to them. I watched my boys fly. They were a little nervous, especially the little one, but that soon disappeared when the adrenaline kicked in.

Their faces say it all. They said that the feeling was unforgettable, they felt light and free.

We give iFly indoor skydiving a big thumbs up
We give iFly indoor skydiving a big thumbs up

The whole experience was definitely one to remember. The instructor was patient, professional and encouraging. My boys didn’t stop smiling for days (and that’s not because the wind in the tunnel had such force that it made it that way). At the end of the experience they were rewarded with a certificate which showed what flying skills they had mastered.

My son won this experience after I entered him into a competition that was run by Coca Cola and blogger Emmys Mummy and Harry Too to uncover an unsung hero. I nominated my son as he was my rock whilst I was having treatment for Cancer and is always putting others first. He is a very determined young boy and deserved a treat. He was my hero and still is.

Thank you for choosing us 🙂

 

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Bungee Jump Experience – The Ultimate Rush for a Teenager

Bungee Jump – The ultimate energy rush, the perfect gift for any daredevil and thrill seeker.

My eldest son is 15 and buying gifts for him is becoming harder every year, although he is very easily pleased and doesn’t really ask for much. I wouldn’t say that he is a daredevil but he certainly likes to experience the wild side.

Leaping 160 ft from a crane, watching the ground rush towards you at a speed of 60mph, attached to nothing but a bungee cord, isn’t really something that I would fancy doing but for a young teenager it’s certainly a very attractive activity. There are no special skills needed, just courage.

I booked him onto a 160ft jump from a crane that is set up near to the 02, London. This isn’t far for us to travel to and is an ideal spot for some lunch after or just a stroll along the River Thames.

We arrived in good time for him to be fully briefed by one of the experienced instructors, before being kitted up and securely fastened into the bungee cord.

He sat in line and watched the previous jumpers leap to the floor. Getting more nervous as he moved along the chairs, getting closer to his turn.

It was a lovely day, the sun was shining and it was a clear blue sky, perfect for us to watch and for him to jump in.

It wasn’t long and it was his turn.

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He was taken up to the top of the crane in cage and once at the top it was seconds before the cage door opened and out he fell, plummeting to the ground only to bounce back up again, dangling by his feet. I half expected to hear him scream, but he was very reserved and held it all back, Or maybe the force of the air in his mouth stopped him from making a sound.

Once he was lowered to the ground he was taken by the shoulders and guided to a mat on the floor where he was taken out of his cord by two instructors.

 

Jak says: “I was pretty nervous, even though I knew that nothing could happen to me I was still anxious about the experience and what to expect. The view from the cage at the top of the crane was amazing, but I didn’t get to look at it for long as I was soon guided over to the edge. I was told to stand still and put my arms directly out in front of me at 90 degree angle. They counted down from 3 and gently pushed me from the edge. I was told not grab anything as I fell from the edge of the cage. As I fell to the floor, it felt like  I was staying still and the ground was moving up towards me, however the feeling of falling was still there. I think the best part of the jump was seeing the 02 upside down. I almost felt like my heart had stopped until the moment I was pulled back up by the cord. It was an experience not to forget. I had a blast and almost wished that it had lasted longer.”

It was the perfect gift for him and I was so proud that he approached the experience with such maturity and gallant.

Jak gives the day a big thumbs up

I booked the bungee jump through Buyagift costing £59, the minimum age of the jumper is 14.

Photos courtesy of Bungee UK

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An Epic Day At Fruit Shoot Mini Mudder

Are you looking for something to get your children out of the house and away from technology?

Let the children loose ready for an adventure on the ultimate obstacle course

Fruit Shoot Mini Mudder is a 1 mile obstacle fun mud run especially designed for children aged between 7 and 12. Mini Mudder gives children a chance to work as a team, get muddy, experience the thrill of adventure and explore their adventurous side. Each Mudder course features 8-10 obstacles that will encourage children to work and support each other.

What makes a Mini Mudder

  • Not scared of getting wet and covered in mud
  • Tough and Strong as some of those obstacles are hard work
  • Working together and helping others
  • Up for an Adventure. Mini Mudder promises to be epic
  • Agility is needed on some of the obstacles
  • Not be a whinger as only babies whine
  • Speed – running between the obstacles
  • Adventurous and ready to explore
  • Challenging – Looking at how to attempt the obstacles
  • Up for anything – Not afraid of getting stuck in

The Mini Mudder course consists of 8-10 obstacles along with lots of mud and water

  • Get tangled in Tumble Weed
  • Sprint up Mini Everest
  • Scale Mount Mud
  • Brave the Tunnel of Terror
  • Teamwork at Got Your Back
  • Conquer the Crazy Climb
  • Plunge into Mud Miles deep pit of thick sludge
  • Let the monkey in you come alive at Hangin’ On, Hangin’ Out
  • Slip through the cracks at Secret Agent Squeeze

Each Mini Mudder event is held alongside Tough Mudder. Each challenge starts on the hour every hour from 9 – 4. We was lucky enough to be invited along to the South London event held at Holmbush Estate.

Dad and the eldest boy have participated in local mud events in previous years so they were looking forward to seeing if lived up to its name sake and if it really was as tough as it offered to be. The youngest two have only ever looked on in awe from the sidelines at such events.

When I told the boys about the Mini Mudder challenge they were ecstatic and couldn’t wait for the adventure to begin. My boys are very competitive, so they found it hard to understand that the event wasn’t a race and that it was just for fun.

We arrived at about 11 and was surprised to see how bloody busy the place was, hundreds and hundreds of mud searching, adrenaline pumping adults all around gearing themselves up for the Tough Mudder Run. The atmosphere was great, everyone was in good spirits including the boys.

After a quick look around we made our way to the mini mudder arena, which wasn’t far from the finishing line to Tough Mudder. Whilst the younger ones were getting ready for their little adventure, Dad and older brother were making their way to the Tough Mudder start line.

Each Mini Mudder wave starts on the hour just after a little fun warm up with the mudder organisers. They are all then walked towards the start line and then let loose on the course.

The boys along with all the other children that took part were quick to get as muddy as they could. I mean who wouldn’t! Children allowed to get in as much mess as they can with their adults consent, that doesn’t happen that often.

It was lovely to see my boys helping each other over the obstacles and giving each other a helping hand when needed. They normally fight and squabble, but for one hour in that day they actually got along. I even witnessed them holding hands at one point. For once there was no sibling rivalry only support and friendship. There was no stopping them, they whizzed around the course in record time, taking on the obstacles like a giant in a playground. They showed determination and took on the challenges set with ease.

 

A fun day was had by all at Tough and Mini Mudder, Mummy was a little tired watching her boys get very muddy but it was worth it seeing the smiles of achievement on their faces. Each adult and child that competed the course received a headband as a keepsake. The children were rewarded with a Fruit Shoot drink at the end, it was much needed as well.

There were showers to clean yourself up and wash away as much mud as possible but we heard that they were quite cold so decided on changing in one of the toilets into clean clothes and just wiping away the mud with some baby wipes.

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They truly did conquer and all that was left to do was wash all of the mud out of their clothes (which took a good soaking in the bath for a couple of days)

If taking part I would advice you to take along spare clothes and shoes, baby wipes, black bag to place dirty clothes in, a towel in case you use the showers and cover you car seats with plastic.

To find out when the next Mini Mudder is available check out their website

We was invited along to participate in the event for the purpose of this post.

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